There are quite a few people who mistakenly believe that the only driving defenses worth fighting against are drunk or drugged driving charges. In reality, there are many kinds of traffic violations that can leave you in a legally precarious position.

Any sort of traffic violation that the courts or law enforcement could consider reckless driving may well warrant a defense. After all, reckless driving is more than just a traffic ticket. It is a misdemeanor offense that can result in fines and even jail time. North Carolina has a reputation for very strict enforcement of traffic laws, so taking a proactive approach is probably smart.

Driving in a careless manner or at high speeds could be reckless driving

Under state law, the definition for reckless driving in North Carolina is quite broad. It encompasses any activity behind the wheel that indicates carelessness or a disregard for the safety or rights of other people. Any sort of driving that law enforcement believes is likely to endanger another person or property is adequate cause to bring reckless driving charges.

The law also includes driving at excessive speeds, with the cutoff for reckless driving varying depending on the posted speed limit on the road. The higher the posted speed limit, the less you have to exceed it to potentially face reckless driving charges. Going faster than 75 miles per hour on any road could be grounds for reckless driving charges, even on a highway with a posted 70 mph speed limit.

In general, any time you drive in an unsafe manner, run a red light or stop sign, pass in a no-passing zone, tailgate, race other vehicles, swerve aggressively through traffic or otherwise behave in a dangerous manner, you run the risk of law enforcement charging you with reckless driving.

There are serious consequences for reckless driving

Whether you were speeding or driving erratically, you could face serious consequences for bad behavior at the wheel. In some cases, you could face an immediate suspension of your license. You will face more penalties when you go to court.

Reckless driving is a Class 2 misdemeanor. That means you could end up spending as long as 60 days in jail or paying as much as $1,000 in fines. A guilty plea or conviction also means you will have four points added to your driver’s license. Acquiring 12 points in 36 months means that you could lose your license for up to a full year. You will also likely have to pay steeper prices for your insurance after a reckless driving conviction.

The best way to minimize the impact of such charges on your life is to simply avoid driving in an unsafe manner on North Carolina roadways.