Traffic offenses can vary in the severity of the punishments they lead to, depending on the circumstances. Drivers who are dealing with allegations of traffic offenses and might lose their driving privileges or face other punishments because of them should be aware of the importance of having a strong legal defense to avoid the harshest penalties.

If, for example, a driver is charged with a moving violation while driving with an already suspended or revoked driver’s license, there are certain penalties that will result. If the driver was driving with a revoked driver’s license and is convicted of a moving violation, there will be an additional penalty of: one year for the first revocation; two years for a second revocation; and a permanent revocation for a third or subsequent incident.

For those whose license has been revoked for one year, it is possible to apply for a driver’s license after 90 days. If it is for two years, the application can be made after 12 months.

Those whose licenses have been revoked permanently can apply for reinstatement after three years. The North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicles has the right to issue a new license, if it is proven that the driver has not been convicted of a moving violation under this law or under the laws of another state while the license was revoked. Restrictions can be placed on the license if the Division believes it to be appropriate.

Losing driving privileges can be a hardship in many ways. When there is an allegation that the person committed a moving violation while driving on a revoked or suspended license, the penalties can be extensive with a longer revocation or suspension. There might have been a mistake by the law enforcement officer or there could have been a justifiable reason that the person was driving while suspended or revoked. Having legal assistance from a law firm that specializes in defending those accused of traffic offenses can help to deal with a case.